General

Scientists identify critical new protein complex involved in learning and memory

Biology News - Tue, 2014-04-22 18:58

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a protein complex that plays a critical but previously unknown role in learning and memory formation.

Categories: Biology News, General

International team sequences rainbow trout genome

Biology News - Tue, 2014-04-22 18:58

Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve.

Categories: Biology News, General

Bioinformatics profiling identifies a new mammalian clock gene

Biology News - Tue, 2014-04-22 18:58


Mice are nocturnal. When both wild type and Chrono knockout mice are kept in an environment with 12 hours of light (blue) and 12 hours of dark (white).They align their... Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. Over 15 mammalian clock proteins have been identified, but researchers surmise there are more. A team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania wondered if big-data approaches could find them.

Categories: Biology News, General

Taxonomic study of green algae (chlorophyta) in Langkawi, Malaysia

Science Daily: New Species - Tue, 2014-04-22 12:08
Tourism is bringing rapid development to the islands of Langkawi, which puts pressure on the marine ecosystem. This research records the diversity and will be a useful baseline record for biomonitoring studies in Malaysia.
Categories: General, Science Daily

Wildlife response to climate change is likely underestimated, experts warn

Science Daily: New Species - Tue, 2014-04-22 11:34
Analyzing thousands of breeding bird surveys sent in by citizen scientists over 35 years, wildlife researchers report that most of the 40 songbird species they studied shifted either northward or toward higher elevation in response to climate change, but did not necessarily do both. This means that most previous studies of potential climate change impacts on wildlife that looked only at one factor or the other have likely underestimated effects.
Categories: General, Science Daily

How are we different and what gave us the advantage over extinct types of humans like the Neanderthals?

Science Daily: New Species - Tue, 2014-04-22 08:47
In parallel with modern man (Homo sapiens), there were other, extinct types of humans with whom we lived side by side, such as Neanderthals and the recently discovered  Denisovans of Siberia. Yet only Homo sapiens survived. What was it in our genetic makeup that gave us the advantage?
Categories: General, Science Daily

What’s in a name? Emmett Reid Dunn and the Oedipus salamanders

Ernst Mayr Library Blog - Thu, 2014-04-17 15:07

When scientists describe a new animal species, they give it a name, according to rules of the ICZN, the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.   Species names can honor a person or the place where the animal lives, or reflect the personality of the describer, as in the case of the beetle Gelae donut (Miller and Wheeler 2004).  Emmet Reid Dunn (1894-1956), who earned his PhD at Harvard under Thomas Barbour, expressed his sense of humor when naming salamanders.  Dunn’s 1921 dissertation on the Plethodontidae was expanded and published in 1926 as The Salamanders of the Family Plethodontidae.   Of the eight Oedipus salamanders that Dunn described there, two stand out: Oedipus rex and Oedipus complex.

Because names change as scientific knowledge advances, both of these names have been revised into ordinariness.   In 1944, E.H. Taylor reassigned the species within the genus Oedipus to eight separate genera, including Oedipina(Keferstein 1868) and the new genus Pseudoeurycea.

Below are references for the type descriptions, the Taylor 1944 and the Encyclopedia of Life entries for both.   The new names are more accurate, but not as clever!

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Oedipus rex, sp.nov. described by E.R. Dunn in 1921.

Common name, Royal False Brook Salamander.

E.R. Dunn, “Two new Central American salamanders”, Proceedings of the Biology Society of Washington vol. 34, pg. 143-146 (1921)

EOL record for Pseudoeurycea rex:   http://eol.org/pages/1019116/overview

Pseudoeurycea rex © 2006 Sean Michael Rovito Source: CalPhotos

 

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

E.H. Taylor, “The genera of Plethodont Salamanders in Mexico, Pt. 1.”, Univ. of Kansas Science Bulletin vol. 30, pg. 189-232 (1944).

Oedipus complex, sp.nov. described by E.R. Dunn in 1924.

Common name, Gamboa worm salamander.

E.R. Dunn, “New Amphibians from Panama”, Occasional Papers of the Boston Society of Natural History vol. 5, pg 93-95 (1924).

EOL record for Oedipina complex:  http://eol.org/pages/2815206/overview/

Oedipina complex © STRI

 

 

Categories: General
Syndicate content